New Telecoms Cabinets in Sandy Lane – and Twitter!

The 5 new Telecoms cabinets blocking the sightline at Sandy Lane junction. As you can see , some are as tall as I am. Under the Telecoms Act, such cabinets count as ‘permitted development’ but telecoms companies are supposed to consult with local highways authorities. SCC did not approve these installations – and would not have done so if they had been consulted!

 

New telecoms cabinets installed on the corner of Sandy Lane and Ipswich Road have been causing  anxiety to Woodbridge residents and Suffolk Highways officers alike since they were  unexpectedly installed over the summer.

Drivers report that visibility to the right coming out of Sandy Lane has been severely affected.  The eastern cabinet is also far too close to the road edge and to passing traffic, could cause cyclists to be squeezed between cabinet and vehicle – and indeed may get hit by something if left as it is.

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A screen grab from Google Maps shows what the junction looked like until the new cabinets were installed in August.

For the last month it has  been impossible to get any response from EE and TMobile (who Highways inform me are the principal companies concerned) so yesterday I took to Twitter to  give the matter the oxygen of publicity and today I spoke about the cabinets on Radio Suffolk’s Breakfast Programme.

Interestingly, this seems to be was what was needed to get things going. EE are now in communication – and tell me they are ‘investigating the matter with the company who installed the cabinets.’

I am  hoping the matter can now be satisfactorily resolved.  Woodbridge residents shouldn’t be expected to have to choose between road safety and a 4G signal

Blue Plaques for Woodbridge Women?

On Saturday, I was fortunate enough to be invited to see 4 blue plaques to famous women unveiled in Ipswich: illustrator Margaret Tempest; archaeologist Nina Layard; suffragette Constance Andrews; and socialist and Mayor, Mary Whitmore. These additions mean that now Ipswich has 17 blue plaques commemorating men and 6 for women. Not gender balance – but better than the previous 17-2 ratio.

Coming home I wondered anew why we in Woodbridge  have no blue plaques at all to commemorate any  famous, inspirational  or unusual women with a Woodbridge connection? The Woodbridge Society has put up 8 – but all to men. Surely it is time to start redressing the balance?

I would like to nominate:

Margaret Agnes Rope, the famous Arts & Crafts stained glass artists trained at Birmingham School of Art, and was taught by Henry Payne. She initially worked in Shrewsbury, but in 1911 went work at the Glass House in Fulham. In 1923 she took the veil, entering the Carmelite nunnery in Woodbridge, Suffolk.  A feisty woman who rode around England on a motorbike in 1918, smoking cigars and getting herself arrested, Margaret was one of the first women to make her living from art. After becoming a Carmelite she continued to work as stained glass artist, and supporting her nunnery through her stained glass window-making thereafter – both in Woodbridge, and when her order moved from there in 1939. Her greatest work is considered to be the Shrewsbury Cathedral west window. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margaret_Agnes_Rope

Archivist and preserver of local records Lilian Jane Redstone (1885-1955), Born in Woodbridge, Lilian Redstone was the first Ipswich and East Suffolk Joint Archivist, adviser to academics world-wide and author of numerous publications. She received an MBE in 1919 for her work during WW1 in the Historical Records Section at the Ministry of Munitions. During WW2 she worked to salvage and preserve documents moving them to places of safety. Her life work is now considered to be the foundation of the Suffolk Records Office. http://ipswichwomeninhistory.co.uk/1800s/lilian-jane-redstone/

Enid Blyton 1897-1968 Bestselling children’s author.  Due to attend the Guildhall School of Music, it was while  staying with  friends at Seckford Hall that Blyton changed her mind. The hall with its ‘haunted’ bedroom, secret passage and surrounding farmland was a source of great delight and inspiration. After helping her friend Ida Hunt at Woodbridge Congregational Sunday School, Enid decided on a career in teaching, trained as a primary school teacher in Ipswich, started writing – and the rest is history. http://www.enidblytonsociety.co.uk/chronology.php

Anne Knight –1792 – 1860. Quaker children’s writer and educationalist.  Eldest child of Woodbridge leather-cutter Jonathan Waspe, she married a London, returning to Woodbridge after his early death to keep a school in Woodbridge. She was a friend of the poet Bernard Barton, who lodged with her and her sisters. She is therefore mentioned several times in letters to him from Charles Lamb. Anne Knight was the author of several children’s books, including School-Room Lyrics (1846), and probably Poetic Gleanings (1827), Mornings in the Library (London, c. 1828, with an introductory poem by Bernard Barton), Mary Gray. A tale for little girls (also including a Barton verse, London, 1831), and Lyriques français: pour la jeunesse. Morceaux choisis par A. K. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Knight_(children%27s_writer)

Finally, there’s the wonderful Elizabeth With – about whom I am trying to find out more, than this glorious snippet:

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Details about Elizabeth WIth of Woodbridge and her book ‘Elizabeth Fools Warning’ – a rare, blow-by-blow depiction of the breakdown of a seventeenth century marriage

These are women that come to mind – I’m sure there must be plenty more. Nominations, anyone?